Part 2-One Good Road

Development, Governance, Human Rights, Zimbabwe

So as the BUS DROVE ON, we all gulped the dust, bore the bumpy road with gritted teeth and wished the driver could slow down just a little bit. He could not have cared less that the once-tarred-road was now more of a gravel road. He was out to make money and make it fast. It being a holiday, (Christmas and the New Year), business was good and he needed to drive as fast as possible, dump us at our destinations and go back for another load.

I thought to myself; all it will take is one good road. One good road that links the farmers to the market to sell their produce. One good road that allows the citizens to have access to a reliable transport network. One good road that allows businesses to transport their goods to the farming communities and limit the time farmers spend travelling to get basic goods. One good road that enables the citizens to have quick and easy access to hospitals. I recalled the stories told of the women dying of complications in childbirth, and the many other people who died on their way to the hospital.

The area I am concerned with today is among the highest cotton producing areas in Zimbabwe. The road is frequented by large haulage trucks transporting farming produce, linking the farmers to the market. That road is so terrible, however, that I had to park my car in Kadoma and use public transport. Many transport operators are unwilling to tour the route arguing that the road will damage their vehicles, causing them to incur more expenses in repairs hence making their businesses unprofitable. The value of a good road both for human development and economic development cannot be overstated and as the African Development Bank always emphasises, good roads facilitate the movement of goods and people from remote areas to the main economic and social structure of the country.  The availability of a good road network, increases traffic flows and hence decreases the economic costs of transporting goods to and from markets. The same roads facilitate access to health, education and information.

The road stretches for only 140 kilometres connecting Kadoma, Patchway, Chakari, Golden Valley, Sanyati, Copper-Queen and Gokwe.Five ( 5 ) different MPs represent the people who need this road to work; Kadoma Central MP -Fani Phanuel Phiri of ZANU (PF), Chakari MP-Aldrin Musiiwa of ZANU (PF), Sanyati MP-Blessed Runesu of ZANU (PF), Gokwe Nembudziya  MP-Mayor Wadyajena of ZANU (PF) and Gokwe Mapfungautsi MP-Mirriam Makweya of ZANU (PF).

Surely if these 4 men and 1 woman are true representatives of their constituencies, the issue of this road shall be a priority on their 5 year mandate as the issue of jackals/hyenas in Buhera is to Comrade Chinotimba. Yes, the rural district councils in some of these areas are tasked with the responsibility to construct and maintain the roads but central government, which the MPs have direct access to and are part of, is bound by national policy to provide resources through the national fiscus, to ensure that the local authorities perform their responsibilities as provided for in the Local Government Act.

I will certainly be watching them. After all, it’s only one good road.

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